Being Keynote Welcome Address to the First MSGBC Oil, Gas and Power Conference, Organized by Energy Capital and Power, under the Auspices of the Ministry of Petroleum and Energies of the Republic of Senegal, in Dakar, Thursday December 16 – 17, 2021.

Being Keynote Welcome Address to the First MSGBC Oil, Gas and Power Conference, Organized by Energy Capital and Power, under the Auspices of the Ministry of Petroleum and Energies of the Republic of Senegal, in Dakar, Thursday December 16 – 17, 2021.

  1. Excellency Macky Sall, President of the Republic of Senegal and Special Guest of Honour at this Conference, Her Excellency Aïssatou Sophie Gladima, Minister of Petroleum and Energies of the Republic of Senegal and Chief host of this Conference, Ministers of APPO Member Countries participating in this Conference, other Ministers, H.E Mohammed Sanusi Barkindo, Secretary General of our senior partner organization, the OPEC, my brother the indefatigable NJ Ayuk, Executive Chairman of the African Energy Chamber, distinguished Speakers and Panelists, the organizers of this Conference, Africa Energy, Capital and Power, other participants, distinguished ladies and gentlemen.
  • APPO is honoured to be invited to give a keynote welcome address to the first MSGBC Oil, Gas and Power Conference, being held under the high patronage of HE Excellency Macky Sall, President of the Republic of Senegal and I should like to begin by commending the government of the Republic of Senegal for this very inspiring initiative. I commend you because you are providing a forum for Africa to continue the discourse on the way forward for its people in the context of the global energy transition. Hopefully, these conversations that are taking place within the industry in various capitals of Africa shall lead to the emergence of a consensus on the way forward for our continent and its people.
  • Your Excellency, keynote addresses are meant to raise salient issues, questions that beg for answers. In some cases they suggest some answers, but not always. What is important is to bring to the fore, the salient issues. The various sessions planned for today and tomorrow shall hopefully try to answer these questions.
  • Three questions readily come to my mind when I consider the topic given to me to speak on: Overview of the African Oil, Gas and Powers Sector, in the context of the Global Energy Transition.
  • The first is Energy Transition: Why now? As most of us are aware the global paradigm shift in energy sources did not start in Africa or the underdeveloped countries of the world. On the contrary it started in today’s developed countries. But all countries, rich and poor, developed an underdeveloped, have been drafted into it, and we are all singing the same chorus.
  • What triggered this global paradigm shift? Is it a sudden discovery by the Scientific community in the last quarter of the last century that the production and the use of fossil fuels emit GHG, which is dangerous to the atmosphere? The answer is no. For as early in 1986, Western scientists had discovered that fossil fuels emit GHG which is harmful to the atmosphere. Why was that knowledge hidden from the public at that time? The answer is that Europe and America needed a lot of energy at that time to consolidate their industrialization and to grow their economies and transform the living conditions of their people. And fossil fuels were the best energy source for that. So, in the national interests of these countries, that knowledge was suppressed, and the world continued to use fossil fuels for many more decades.
  • Then something went wrong in global geopolitics. The unthinkable happened. America and some European countries that had grown to depend heavily on foreign fossil fuels for many decades, woke up in 1973 to an oil embargo by their major suppliers, the Kuwait-based Organization of Arab Petroleum Exporting Countries, OAPEC, not to be mistaken for the Vienna based OPEC, over the Arab-Israeli war. For the first time since the end of the World War II, America found itself rationing fuel at pump stations. That experience made these countries resolve to have energy security, by which they meat to wean themselves from dependency on foreign oil. The initial strategy was for the state to support local production of oil and gas. Huge amounts of money was spent on research to make shale production commercially viable. The global oil market was also manipulated from 2003 to artificially raise conventional crude prices in order to make shale oil competitive. That largely explains the spiral rise of oil prices from about USD 25 per barrel in 2003 to about USD 150 in 2008.
  • When that strategy failed, the West decided to find another energy source and immediately embarked on a policy of supporting research on renewable energy. To justify the huge amount of financial support for renewable energy research, the authorities also commissioned studies on the adverse effects of fossil fuels on the planet. As noted earlier, this is not unknown. For about 100 years, the Western scientific community had known about emissions from fossil fuels. But those findings were not popularized because today’s industrialized countries needed that source of energy to consolidate their industrialization and economy growth. They needed fossil fuels to transform their transportation, their agriculture, medicine and the entire fabric of their society. They needed that energy to propel their societies from reliance on wealth created from the production of manufactured goods in factories, which is energy intensive, to post-fossil fuel economy, where wealth is created from the manufacture of knowledge and artificial intelligence and therefore requires little energy. And that is where these societies are today.
  • So, from the last quarter of the 20th century a series of researches were commissioned to prove and popularized what had already been known a century earlier, namely that fossil fuels produce GHG which are detrimental to the planet ant by extension human existence. A lot of money was devoted to the climate project, including at the UN. There was a concerted effort to demonize fossil fuels in order to popularize renewable energies.
  1. Excellencies, the point I am trying to make is that for as long as today’s industrialized countries needed fossil fuels to grow their economies and transform their societies, they did not allow climate change to become a global issue. Now that they have transformed their economies to rely less on energy, but more on knowledge production and artificial intelligence, and the poor countries of the world, particularly Africa, are on the verge of industrialization, we are being told that the energy that transformed the economies of today’s industrialized nations, is not good for the world to use.
  1. The fact is that after China, the next global power shall be in Africa and every effort is being made to kill the rise of Africa. The question then is: If the developed countries were the ones blessed with abundant fossil fuels as Africa is, with 125 billion barrels of crude oil and over 500 trillion cubic feet of gas, will they abandon fossil fuels, or will they develop the technology to make it environmentally friendly? Necessity is the mother of invention. Many believe that if the developed countries want to, they can develop and commercialize technologies that will make fossil fuels good for use. I recall vividly that during the 3rd Summit of OPEC Heads of States in Riyadh in 2007, Saudi Arabia and some other Members of OPEC offered USD 1 billion to any research institution ready to work on developing and commercializing technologies that will make oil environmentally friendly. None of the world’s famous petroleum institutions went for the grant.
  1. The second issue I would like to highlight is the implication of the successful pursuit of the objectives and pathways of energy transition, as currently defined, on African oil and gas producing countries. I emphasize the African oil and gas producing countries decidedly. Not because we are the only or biggest producers of either oil or gas. Indeed, there are individual countries, outside of Africa, whose daily oil production far exceeds the total production of all of Africa. The emphasis on Africa is because our oil and gas producers are the most dependent on oil and external revenue to meet some of the basic obligations of the state. Others have wisely succeeded in diversifying their economies, such that the impact of the transition will not be as harsh to them as may African producers.
  1. Another implication is that we are going to declare a large volume of the 125 billion barrels and over 500 tcf of gas as stranded assets when we have over 900 million Africans living without access to modern energy and some 600 million with no access to electricity.
  1. Your excellency, distinguished guests, on the final point for consideration, namely the way forward, I would like to emphasize that for APPO and I believe for Africa, climate change is real and we support measures aimed at protecting the environment for this and future generations. But such measures must conform with the “principle of equity and common but differentiated responsibilities and respective capabilities, in the light of different national circumstances” as enshrined in the Paris Climate Agreement as this principle was key in assuaging the fears of developing countries, especially oil and gas producing countries, in the early years of the climate negotiation process.
  1. Distinguished ladies and gentlemen, it is sad that the above key principle of the Paris Climate Agreement, the inclusion of which was central to getting developing countries, including APPO Member Countries, to accede to the Agreement, has now been relegated to the background, limiting it to discussions about financial assistance to poor countries to enable them execute energy transition programs. In other words, we are being told that our key concerns can be taken care of with money, hence the establishment of the Climate Fund essentially for amelioration and adaptation as poor countries make the transition from fossil fuels to renewable energies.
  1. But is the principle of equity and common but differentiated responsibilities and respective capabilities … All about financial assistance? Does it not also include technological assistance, like the provision of technologies that will enable poor countries with huge petroleum reserves to produce these resources for the use of their people, with minimum carbon footprints? Why are we not talking about popularizing such technologies as CCUS, DAC, Carbon Sync etc.? Why is all the conversation on adaptation and mitigation? Why are we being pressurized to abandon what we have in abundance for what we have no technology for?
  1. Talking about climate finance, a number of questions beg for answers:
  1. What guarantee have we that the pledged amounts will be redeemed, given the unenviable history of redemption of past pledges on climate issues?
  1. How much of the funds are going to mitigation and how much to adaptation?
  • How much of those funds are grants and how much are loans to be repaid with interest in the future?
  • What conditions are attached to the allocation and disbursement of the climate funds?
  • Will taking those funds now lead Africa back into the debt trap?
  • Ladies and gentlemen, whatever the answers to the above questions are, they point to the need for Africa to consider looking inwards for solutions to its many problems. We cannot afford to classify 125 billion barrels of crude oil and hundreds of trillions of cubic feet of gas as stranded assets when we have the largest proportion of the global population living in energy poverty, when our continent with 17% of the world population contributed no more than 3.5% of global GHG emissions, and when we have neither the capital nor the technology for the new energies but at least have some of the basic infrastructure of fossil energy.
  • Energy transition should provide Africa an opportunity to take its destiny into its own hands. For oil producing countries, this is the time to create a continental or regional oil and gas market. This is the time to pool resources together to create or expand cross-country regional energy infrastructure.
  • This is the time to create or expand refineries and petrochemical plants to serve the continent and its regions, not just countries.
  • This is the time to look beyond national local content in the oil and gas industry on the continent to regional and continental content.
  • There is a limit to what we can achieve in local content as individual countries. But as a collective, Africa can scale this critical hurdle. And that is what APPO is poised to do. And on behalf of APPO, I should like to thank HE President Macky Sall for setting in motion the process of making Senegal a full member of APPO. There is no other way Africa can move forward.
  • And there is no better time than now that we are losing our traditional markets for oil and gas and fortuitously at a time the Africa Free Continental Trade Agreement has come into force. The time to act is now.
  • Thank you Mr. President. And I thank you all for your kind attention.

Discours de Bienvenue à la Première Conférence du MSGBC sur le Pétrole, le Gaz et l’Electricité, Organisée par Energy Capital and Power, sous les Auspices du Ministère du Pétrole et des Energies de la République du Sénégal, à Dakar, du jeudi 16 au vendredi 17 décembre 2021.

  1. Excellence Monsieur Macky Sall, Président de la République du Sénégal et Invité d’Honneur de cette Conférence, Son Excellence Madame Aïssatou Sophie Gladima, Ministre du Pétrole et des Energies de la République du Sénégal et Hôte Principal de cette Conférence, les Ministres des Pays Membres de l’APPO participant à cette Conférence, d’autres Ministres, Son Excellence Mohammed Sanusi Barkindo, Secrétaire Général de notre organisation partenaire principale, l’OPEP, mon frère l’infatigable NJ Ayuk, Président Exécutif de l’African Energy Chamber, les distingués Orateurs et Panélistes, les organisateurs de cette Conférence, Africa Energy, Capital and Power, les autres participants, mesdames et messieurs.
  • L’APPO est honorée d’avoir été invitée à prononcer un discours de bienvenue à la première Conférence du MSGBC sur le Pétrole, le Gaz et l’Electricité, qui se tient sous le haut patronage de S.E. Macky Sall, Président de la République du Sénégal, et je voudrais commencer par féliciter le gouvernement de la République du Sénégal pour cette initiative très inspirante. Je vous félicite parce que vous offrez un forum à l’Afrique pour poursuivre la réflexion sur la voie à suivre pour sa population dans le contexte de la transition énergétique mondiale. J’espère que les conversations qui ont lieu au sein de l’industrie dans les différentes capitales africaines conduiront à l’émergence d’un consensus sur la voie à suivre pour notre continent et ses habitants.
  • Votre Excellence, les discours-programmes sont censés soulever des problèmes saillants, des questions qui méritent des réponses. Dans certains cas, ils suggèrent des réponses, mais pas toujours. Ce qui est important, c’est de mettre en évidence les questions les plus importantes. Les différentes sessions prévues aujourd’hui et demain tenteront, nous l’espérons, de répondre à ces questions.
  • Trois questions me viennent immédiatement à l’esprit lorsque je considère le sujet qui m’a été donné de traiter : Aperçu du Secteur Africain du Pétrole, du Gaz et des Énergies, dans le Contexte de la Transition Énergétique Mondiale.
  • Le premier est la Transition Énergétique : Pourquoi maintenant ? Comme la plupart d’entre nous le savent, le changement de paradigme mondial en matière de sources d’énergie n’a pas commencé en Afrique ou dans les pays sous-développés du monde. Au contraire, il a commencé dans les pays développés d’aujourd’hui. Mais tous les pays, qu’ils soient riches ou pauvres, développés ou sous-développés, y ont participé et nous chantons tous le même refrain.
  • Qu’est-ce qui a déclenché ce changement de paradigme mondial ? Est-ce une découverte soudaine de la communauté scientifique au cours du dernier quart du siècle dernier que la production et l’utilisation de combustibles fossiles émettent des GES, ce qui est dangereux pour l’atmosphère ? La réponse est non. En effet, dès 1986, les scientifiques occidentaux avaient découvert que les combustibles fossiles émettent des GES qui sont dangereux pour l’atmosphère. Pourquoi cette connaissance a-t-elle été cachée au public à l’époque ? La réponse est que l’Europe et l’Amérique avaient alors besoin de beaucoup d’énergie pour consolider leur industrialisation, faire croître leurs économies et transformer les conditions de vie de leurs populations. Et les combustibles fossiles étaient la meilleure source d’énergie pour cela. Ainsi, dans l’intérêt national de ces pays, ces connaissances ont été supprimées, et le monde a continué à utiliser les combustibles fossiles pendant de nombreuses décennies.
  • Puis quelque chose a mal tourné dans la géopolitique mondiale. L’impensable s’est produit. L’Amérique et certains pays européens, qui dépendaient fortement des combustibles fossiles étrangers depuis plusieurs décennies, se sont réveillés en 1973 avec un embargo pétrolier décrété par leurs principaux fournisseurs, l’Organisation des Pays Arabes Exportateurs de Pétrole (OPAEP) basée au Koweït, à ne pas confondre avec l’OPEP basée à Vienne, en raison de la guerre israélo-arabe. Pour la première fois depuis la fin de la Seconde Guerre Mondiale, l’Amérique s’est retrouvée à rationner le carburant dans les stations-service. Cette expérience a fait naître dans ces pays la volonté d’avoir une sécurité énergétique, c’est-à-dire de se sevrer de la dépendance au pétrole étranger. La stratégie initiale consistait pour l’État à soutenir la production locale de pétrole et de gaz. D’énormes sommes d’argent ont été consacrées à la recherche pour rendre la production de schiste commercialement viable. Le marché mondial du pétrole a également été manipulé à partir de 2003 pour augmenter artificiellement les prix du brut conventionnel afin de rendre le pétrole de schiste compétitif. Cela explique en grande partie la hausse en spirale des prix du pétrole, qui sont passés d’environ 25 USD par baril en 2003 à environ 150 USD en 2008.
  • Lorsque cette stratégie a échoué, l’Occident a décidé de trouver une autre source d’énergie et s’est immédiatement lancé dans une politique de soutien à la recherche sur les énergies renouvelables. Pour justifier l’énorme soutien financier accordé à la recherche sur les énergies renouvelables, les autorités ont également commandé des études sur les effets néfastes des combustibles fossiles sur la planète. Comme nous l’avons déjà souligné, cette situation n’est pas inconnue. Depuis environ 100 ans, la communauté scientifique occidentale connaissait les émissions des combustibles fossiles. Mais ces découvertes n’ont pas été popularisées parce que les pays industrialisés d’aujourd’hui avaient besoin de cette source d’énergie pour consolider leur industrialisation et la croissance de leur économie. Ils avaient besoin des combustibles fossiles pour transformer leurs transports, leur agriculture, leur médecine et tout le tissu de leur société. Ils avaient besoin de cette énergie pour faire passer leurs sociétés d’une dépendance à l’égard de la richesse créée par la production de biens manufacturés dans des usines, qui consomme beaucoup d’énergie, à une économie post-combustible fossile, où la richesse est créée par la fabrication de connaissances et d’intelligence artificielle et nécessite donc peu d’énergie. Et c’est là où en sont ces sociétés aujourd’hui.
  • Ainsi, à partir du dernier quart du 20e siècle, une série de recherches ont été commandées pour prouver et populariser ce que l’on savait déjà un siècle plus tôt, à savoir que les combustibles fossiles produisent des GES qui nuisent à la planète et par extension à l’existence humaine. Beaucoup d’argent a été consacré au projet climatique, y compris à l’ONU. Il y a eu un effort concerté pour diaboliser les combustibles fossiles afin de populariser les énergies renouvelables.
  1. Excellences, ce que j’essaie de dire, c’est que tant que les pays industrialisés d’aujourd’hui ont eu besoin de combustibles fossiles pour faire croître leurs économies et transformer leurs sociétés, ils n’ont pas permis au changement climatique de devenir un problème mondial. Maintenant qu’ils ont transformé leurs économies pour qu’elles dépendent moins de l’énergie, mais davantage de la production de connaissances et de l’intelligence artificielle, et que les pays pauvres du monde, en particulier l’Afrique, sont sur le point de s’industrialiser, on nous dit que l’énergie qui a transformé les économies des nations industrialisées d’aujourd’hui n’est pas bonne pour le monde.
  1. Le fait est qu’après la Chine, la prochaine puissance mondiale serait en Afrique et tous les efforts sont faits pour tuer la montée de l’Afrique. La question qui se pose alors est la suivante : si les pays développés avaient la chance de disposer de combustibles fossiles en abondance, comme c’est le cas de l’Afrique, avec 125 milliards de barils de pétrole brut et plus de 500 trillions de pieds cubes de gaz, abandonneraient-ils les combustibles fossiles ou développeraient-ils la technologie nécessaire pour les rendre respectueux de l’environnement ? La nécessité est la mère de l’invention. Ils sont nombreux à penser que si les pays développés le veulent, ils peuvent développer et commercialiser des technologies qui rendront les combustibles fossiles utilisables. Je me souviens très bien que lors du Troisième Sommet des Chefs d’Etats de l’OPEP à Riyad en 2007, l’Arabie Saoudite et d’autres membres de l’OPEP ont offert 1 milliard de dollars à toute institution de recherche prête à travailler sur le développement et la commercialisation de technologies qui rendront le pétrole écologique. Aucune des célèbres institutions pétrolières du monde n’a sollicité cette subvention.
  1. La deuxième question que je voudrais souligner est l’implication de la poursuite réussie des objectifs et des voies de la transition énergétique, tels qu’ils sont actuellement définis, sur les pays africains producteurs de pétrole et de gaz. J’insiste résolument sur les pays africains producteurs de pétrole et de gaz. Non pas parce que nous sommes les seuls ou les plus grands producteurs de pétrole ou de gaz. En effet, il existe des pays, en dehors de l’Afrique, dont la production quotidienne de pétrole dépasse de loin la production totale de l’Afrique. Si nous mettons l’accent sur l’Afrique, c’est parce que nos producteurs de pétrole et de gaz sont les plus dépendants du pétrole et des recettes extérieures pour faire face à certaines des obligations fondamentales de l’État. D’autres ont sagement réussi à diversifier leurs économies, de sorte que l’impact de la transition ne sera pas aussi dur pour eux que pour les producteurs africains.
  1. Une autre implication est que nous allons déclarer une grande partie des 125 milliards de barils et plus de 500 trillions de pieds cubes de gaz comme des actifs échoués alors que plus de 900 millions d’Africains vivent sans accès à l’énergie moderne et que 600 millions n’ont pas accès à l’électricité.
  1. Votre excellence, chers invités, en ce qui concerne le dernier point à examiner, à savoir la voie à suivre, je voudrais souligner que pour l’APPO et, je crois, pour l’Afrique, le changement climatique est réel et nous soutenons les mesures visant à protéger l’environnement pour les générations actuelles et futures. Mais ces mesures doivent être conformes au “principe d’équité, de responsabilités communes mais différenciées et de capacités respectives, compte tenu des différentes situations nationales”, tel qu’il est inscrit dans l’Accord de Paris sur le Climat, car ce principe a été essentiel pour apaiser les craintes des pays en développement, en particulier des pays producteurs de pétrole et de gaz, au cours des premières années du processus de négociation climatique.
  1. Mesdames et Messieurs, il est triste de constater que le principe clé de l’Accord de Paris sur le Climat, dont l’inclusion était essentielle pour inciter les pays en développement, y compris les Pays Membres de l’APPO, à adhérer à l’Accord, a maintenant été relégué au second plan, le limitant à des discussions sur l’assistance financière aux pays pauvres pour leur permettre d’exécuter des programmes de transition énergétique. En d’autres termes, on nous dit que nos principales préoccupations peuvent être prises en charge avec de l’argent, d’où la création du Fonds pour le Climat, essentiellement destiné à l’amélioration et à l’adaptation des pays pauvres lors de leur passage des combustibles fossiles aux énergies renouvelables.
  1. Mais est-ce que le principe d’équité, les responsabilités communes mais différenciées et les capacités respectives … ne concerne-t-il que l’aide financière ? N’inclut-il pas aussi l’assistance technologique, comme la fourniture de technologies qui permettront aux pays pauvres disposant d’énormes réserves de pétrole de produire ces ressources pour l’usage de leur population, avec une empreinte carbone minimale ? Pourquoi ne parlons-nous pas de populariser des technologies telles que CCUS, DAC, Carbon Sync, etc. ? Pourquoi toutes les conversations portent-elles sur l’adaptation et l’atténuation ? Pourquoi sommes-nous poussés à abandonner ce que nous avons en abondance pour ce pour quoi nous n’avons pas de technologie ?
  1. En ce qui concerne le financement relatif au climat, un certain nombre de questions appellent des réponses :
  1. Quelle garantie avons-nous que les montants promis seront remboursés, étant donné l’histoire peu enviable du remboursement des engagements passés sur les questions climatiques ?
  1. Quelle part des fonds est consacrée à l’atténuation et quelle part à l’adaptation ?
  • Combien de ces fonds sont des subventions et combien sont des prêts à rembourser avec intérêts dans le futur ?
  • Quelles sont les conditions liées à l’allocation et au décaissement des fonds climatiques ?
  • En prenant ces fonds maintenant, l’Afrique va-t-elle retomber dans le piège de la dette ?
  • Mesdames et Messieurs, quelles que soient les réponses aux questions ci-dessus, elles montrent que l’Afrique doit envisager de se tourner vers l’intérieur pour trouver des solutions à ses nombreux problèmes. Nous ne pouvons pas nous permettre de classer 125 milliards de barils de pétrole brut et des centaines de trillions de pieds cubes de gaz comme des actifs échoués alors que la plus grande partie de la population mondiale vit dans la pauvreté énergétique, alors que notre continent, avec 17% de la population mondiale, ne contribue qu’à 3,5% des émissions mondiales de gaz à effet de serre, et alors que nous n’avons ni le capital ni la technologie pour les nouvelles énergies mais que nous disposons au moins d’une partie de l’infrastructure de base des énergies fossiles.
  • La transitvion énergétique devrait donner à l’Afrique l’occasion de prendre son destin en main. Pour les pays producteurs de pétrole, c’est le moment de créer un marché continental ou régional du pétrole et du gaz. C’est le moment de mettre en commun les ressources pour créer ou développer des infrastructures énergétiques régionales transnationales.
  • C’est le moment de créer ou d’étendre les raffineries et les usines pétrochimiques pour desservir le continent et ses régions, et pas seulement les pays.
  • Il est temps de dépasser le contenu local national dans l’industrie du pétrole et du gaz sur le continent pour envisager un contenu régional et continental.
  • Il y a une limite à ce que nous pouvons réaliser en matière de contenu local en tant que pays individuels. Mais en tant que collectivité, l’Afrique peut franchir cet obstacle critique. Et c’est ce que l’APPO est prête à faire. Et au nom de l’APPO, je voudrais remercier S.E. le Président Macky Sall d’avoir lancé le processus d’adhésion du Sénégal à l’APPO. Il n’y a pas d’autre moyen pour l’Afrique d’aller de l’avant.
  • Et il n’y a pas de meilleur moment que maintenant, alors que nous perdons nos marchés traditionnels pour le pétrole et le gaz et que, fortuitement, l’Accord de Libre-Échange Continental Africain est entré en vigueur. C’est maintenant qu’il faut agir.
  • Je vous remercie, Monsieur le Président. Et je vous remercie tous pour votre aimable attention.
English EN French FR